Quick Guide Sensory Processing Disorder for Newbies Our Quick Guide to Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) for Newbies can help you identify behavior patterns and find helpful tools for the daily challenges. Sensory Processing Disorder is a term we hear often. Though we all struggle with sensory overload at times, Sensory Processing Disorder has specific symptoms and treatments.

Quick Guide to Sensory Processing Disorder

1. Sensory Modulation Disorder,one of the most familiar types, is when an individual under responds, over responds or seeks out sensory stimulation. These responses are triggered when the nervous system can't easily interpret input from sights, sounds, textures, and smells.

Tools for Each Type of Sensory Processing Need

Therapy tools and techniques can help regulate the response to sensory input For example, someone who is under responsive can appear "lost in space" or low energy or not respond when called by name. To help, we use movement tools and heightened sensory tools to encourage organization. For a sensory seeker who can't sit still, touches others or bites, we try to calm and engage their system. Sensory motor tools such as heavy handwork, wiggle cushions and eye-hand tools are helpful. Finally, an over-responsive individual with heightened sensory responses, stress or anxiety, can find weight or compression to be calming.
Quick Guide to Sensory Processing Disorder for Newbies - Sensory Bin Kit
Sensory Bin Kit
Quick Guide Sensory Processing Disorder for Newbies - Wiggle Cushion
Wiggle Cushion

Sensory Challenges with Movement

2. Sensory-Based Motor Disorder reflects how the body adapts to sensory input. Small movements are challenging, like riding an escalator or getting in a car. The frustration can trigger tantrums or sedentary behavior. To help, we use balance beams, balance boards, rockers and mobility tools. The goal is to strengthen the vestibular system and postural responses.
Quick Guide to Sensory Processing Disorder for Newbies - Build N Balance Set
Build N Balance Set
Quick Guide to Sensory Processing Disorder for Newbies - Tummy Scooter
Soft Tummy Scooter
 

Sensory Challenges with Perception

3. Sensory Perception/Discrimination Disorder relates to detecting differences in location, intensity, timing or objects. For example, if I put a quarter and a nickel in your hand, can you tell them apart by feeling? Someone with this challenge may hold on too tight or not tight enough, not knowing the right touch to apply. To help, we look closely at how the person perceives vision, sound, touch, movement and taste. In addition, we work with putty, rolling pins, and sand. Heavy and light handwork help as well.
Quick Guide to Sensory Processing Disorder for Newbies - Grab and Go Putty
Grab and Go Putty
Quick Guide to Sensory Processing Disorder for Newbies - At The Beach Weighted Sand Kit
At The Beach Weighted Sand Kit

Now that You Have a Quick Guide to Sensory Processing Disorder...

In conclusion, it's fair to say most occupational therapists are well versed in sensory processing disorder. Your OT can help you focus on what helps. And you can contact our expert team as well as refer to this Quick Guide to Sensory Processing Disorder. When you keep your eyes and ears open, you gain a better understanding of yourself and your children.