Still Loving on Dad?

Having second thoughts about what you got your husband or partner for Father’s Day? It’s not too late to make it even better. Tell the world what you appreciate about his parenting style, especially as it relates to special needs. Not only will he feel appreciated, but you may even win a $50 gift certificate for posting on our page.

You earn extra chances if you share a video of dad or email some details to submissions@funandfunction.com so we can interview dad for a blog post. Hurry – the contest ends this Friday, June 24th.

If you’re puzzled about Dad’s “secret sauce” for parenting, check out these insights “How Fathers’ Teasing, Tickling, Wrestling Teach Kids to Whine Less and Be More Independent.” Read more >

6 years ago by 1

One thought on “Still Loving on Dad?

  1. My husband, Brandon, is the best dad!

    When we adopted two children with special needs in the span of six months, we were new and scared. He tackled parenting with ease. He is gentle, kind, and encouraging.

    In contrast to my scheduled and routine days, daddy comes home after work, and our children know what time it is.

    Even before walking in the door, both of my children hear the truck pulling up and giggles ensues in our home. Brandon wastes no time. He colors with them. He paints with them. He understands their needs, and continues to be as involved as possible with their day to day therapies.

    Two weeks ago we decided to build a fort. Brandon took charge and turned our living room into an awesome fort. All the blankets and pillows in the entire house were now in our living room, but inside our magic fort time stood still. Cell phones were turned off. S mores were cooked. A family movie was put on, and we played. We crawled and discovered well past bedtime.

    Scenes like this are common at our house. Brandon takes a more laid back approach to parenting our children. With Matthew, who is two and medically fragile, Brandon doesn’t see that. He sees his son. The boys are constantly outside working on the “race car.”
    With Autumn, who is two and paraplegic, Brandon doesn’t see a wheelchair. He sees a boat, or a horse, or a plane. Whatever the day calls for, he turns our ordinary into extraordinary.

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